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Category Archives for "Influence Lives. One Person At A Time."

Are You Indispensable?

Seth Godin's Linchpin is for you. Your boss. Your team.

Linchpin is about leading, and change, and fear, and succeess.

You couldn't write this book ten years ago, because ten years ago, the economy wanted you to fit in. It took care of you . . . if you fit in. Now, the world wants something different. This book exposes a multi-generational conspiracy to sap your creativity.

What if you learned a different way of seeing?
A different way of giving?
A different way of making a living?
What if you could do it, without leaving your job?
(Or joining a network marketing scheme.)

A way . . . to contribute your true self and your best work.

Are you up for that?

Why Your Salary Will Always Be Below Average

By Rho Lall

Have you been on glassdoor lately? Maybe you’ve tried the Payscale salary calculator? Is your take home pay below average? Chances are it is. Use the calculator below and find out.

It’s ok . . . i’ll wait.

Did you check it out? Is that surprising? Before you start planning how to bring this up with your boss you might want to take a second look at that number. I'll explain.

Income follows a power law distribution.

There are two issues with this number. First you will run into trouble if you look for averages where there aren't any. Income follows a power law distribution.

What’s that?

If you have heard of Pareto’s 80/20 rule, that is a power distribution. For income, 80% of the income is earned by 20% of people. Don’t take that literally. 

If we plot out income (see image above) you would see a small number of people (in green) earn a disproportionately larger amount of money relative to everyone else (in yellow). 

If you try to take the average of a set of incomes (any power distribution) your average will wildly misrepresent the truth. It's going to underestimate a small number of people, and overestimate the majority. The average (in blue) makes it seem seem like higher incomes are more common than they are in actuality. Case and point:

Bill Gates walks into a bar and everyone inside becomes a millionaire . . .
 . . . on average.

Accurate, real-time salaries for thousands of careers.

So when you or someone else pulls up a report on glassdoor and circles the average salary, it is likely not telling the whole story.

But. You might ask, what if Bill Gates doesn’t walk into the bar? What if in this bar we only have locals who all work the same job. I like where your head's at. You might be onto something. But no, you’re not.

Income follows a power distribution even on a localized scale, it's just less noticeable. Let's look at SaaS Implementation Consultants in Provo, UT (see right). The average is $50,800. But look at the range. The low is $39K and the high is $78K. There are a few highly paid individuals driving the average up but most consultants probably earn less than 50K. In full disclosure I don’t know. But the point is neither do you.


The average is not representative of this sample. Let alone the salaries that were not reported.

Implementation consultant earn $50,800  in Provo, UT are on average.

Average is not the same as usual and customary.

Here is the second issue. What do you think of when I say average? When we talk averages, most people assume it's a mean. Most people would agree that average and mean are synonymous. That is not the case. An average doesn't have to be a mean. You can google the definition: a number expressing the central or typical value in a set of data, in particular:

the mode, median, or mean

When you read about an average, you could be reading about one of three different measurements. It's easy to be mislead. The government reports median income. Median is the middle number: 50% earn above median, 50% below. But what if I want to know what salary is usual and customary? What do most people make? This is the mode. If you want to get a sense of where the long tail on the power law distribution falls, the mode would work best. It will tell you what the most common salary is. That could be useful.


The lesson:

Don’t hang your hat on average salary. First, averages don’t fit the data very well. You can take the average, that doesn’t mean you should. Second, when you see an average take steps to learn what kind of average it is. Personally, I find the bookends, the high and low values of a range, to be more useful.

Do you want to learn more? If you a SaaS professional that struggles with aligning your team & getting to the truth then you have come to the right place. Find out how to use averages, bookends, and other KIPs to make better use of your data so you can . . .

Confront The Deluge of Information.

Perfect for people that want to become leaders! You don’t have to be an expert math person to be data literate - Download the FREE report.

Why would you want to learn to “Bull Doze Through Bull Sh*t”?​

  • Would you benefit from a deeper knowledge from your data? Probably.
  • Do statistics and data analysis intimidate you? It intimidates most people.
  • Do you want to be able to make use of all the data you have access to, so that you can make better business decisions? Of course you do!

Stop letting your fear of “number crunching” keep you from learning what is actually true. Sign up for my newsletter, and download my FREE Report on making sense of data without becoming a math expert!

Confront The Deluge of Information.

Bulldoze_thru_bullshit

Perfect for people that want to become leaders! You don’t have to be an expert math person to be data literate - Download the FREE report.

Why would you want to learn to “Bull Doze Through Bull Sh*t”?

Would you benefit from deeper knowledge from your data?
Probably.

Do statistics and data analysis intimidate you?
It intimidates most people.

Do you want to be able to make use of all the data you have access to, so that you can make better business decisions?
Of course you do!
Stop letting your fear of “number crunching” keep you from learning what is actually true. Sign up for my newsletter, and download my FREE Report on making sense of data without becoming a math expert! Powered by ConvertKit

What Makes The Difference

by Rho Lall​

Hey:

I want to share a story with you from my experience at BYU. It was a memorable lesson for me, and I hope you’ll get something out of it as well.

At BYU, it’s common for alumni to return as guest lecturers. In this case, one of the men in the story had returned to share his experience with us.

The story starts on a late spring afternoon, twenty-five years ago, the day two young men graduated from BYU. These men shared similar qualities. Both were better than average students, both were personable, both were returned missionaries, and both were filled with dreams and ambition for the future.

Recently, these two men returned to college for their 25th reunion.

They are still very much alike. Both happily married. Both have four children. And both, it turns out, work for the same bank.

But there is one big difference between them.

One of the men is a mid-level manager of a small department of that company. The other is president of his division.

What Made The Difference?

Why was it that one of the men was a division president, and not just a mid-level department manager like the other? What makes this kind of difference in people’s lives? Do you wonder sometimes?

It usually isn’t just native intelligence, talent, or dedication. It definitely isn’t that one person wants success, and the other doesn’t.

The difference lies in what each person knows, and how he or she makes use of that knowledge.

The man that became the division president simply made better decisions. Over time, that led to him getting more responsibility, and the status and pay that comes with it.

Our world is filled with information, and almost everyone has access to it. Your ability to make sense of that data, and to use it to make good decisions, is the best way for your set yourself apart.

Confront The Deluge of Information.

Perfect for people that want to become leaders! You don’t have to be an expert math person to be data literate - Download the FREE report.

Why would you want to learn to “Bull Doze Through Bull Sh*t”?​

  • Would you benefit from a deeper knowledge from your data? Probably.
  • Do statistics and data analysis intimidate you? It intimidates most people.
  • Do you want to be able to make use of all the data you have access to, so that you can make better business decisions? Of course you do!

Stop letting your fear of “number crunching” keep you from learning what is actually true. Sign up for my newsletter, and download my FREE Report on making sense of data without becoming a math expert!

Confront The Deluge of Information.

Bulldoze_thru_bullshit

Perfect for people that want to become leaders! You don’t have to be an expert math person to be data literate - Download the FREE report.

Why would you want to learn to “Bull Doze Through Bull Sh*t”?

Would you benefit from deeper knowledge from your data?
Probably.

Do statistics and data analysis intimidate you?
It intimidates most people.

Do you want to be able to make use of all the data you have access to, so that you can make better business decisions?
Of course you do!
Stop letting your fear of “number crunching” keep you from learning what is actually true. Sign up for my newsletter, and download my FREE Report on making sense of data without becoming a math expert! Powered by ConvertKit

I Got Fired because I made a huge mistake. What Now?

I Got Fired Because I Made A Huge Mistake. What Now?

By Rho Lall

There's an urban legend about a young executive sitting in Tom Watson Jr's office just waiting to be fired.

The year is 1968. The exec works at IBM. His boss is Tom Watson Jr, a leader of the information revolution. The issue at hand, a series of mistakes costing several million dollars. These mistakes led to him sitting across from Watson waiting for summary dismissal.

 

"I suppose after that set of mistakes you will be wanting to fire me."

 

Watson's response is now part of MBA cannon/lore:

 

"Not at all young man, we have just spent a couple of million dollars educating you."

 

Remember that the next time you make a mistake at work. But even if they fired you, the moral is to learn the lessons.

Source: Balanced Scorecard Diagnostics: Maintaining Maximum Performance.

 

8 Lessons Leaned When I Lost My Job Because I Made A Huge Mistake.

 

1. A lot of people get fired. Don't feel bad.

2. Verify what legally happened. Employers will "lay off" employees to limit risk of wrongful terminations suits. It is also a pain in the ass that requires a lot of documents. If it comes up during the interview keep your answer brief and to the point: "I worked at (that employer) for X years. I was responsible for . . ."

3. Ask for a letter of recommendation. It can hurt your pride, but not much else. A letter of recommendation makes calling for references unnecessary. If not from your supervisor, you can get them from other people in the company.

4. Never lie to a prospective employer.

5. With respect to Unemployment Insurance Benefits, do your homework. Rules and/or how they are carried out varies state to state.

6. Don't be a victim. It takes two to tango. If your side of the story is a version of "It's all their fault", you are only fooling yourself. Advocate for yourself, by avoid blaming, and be objective.

7. Learn from the experience. Take time for yourself to write down what you have learned from the experience. Share (even if it is only with yourself) the wisdom about yourself and your abilities that you have gained from this experience.

8. Remember, you are not Justine Sacco.

 

Justine Sacco used to work as the PR Director for InterActiveCorp (IAC). In 2013 she tweeted to a following of under 200 people,

 

 

Then she boarded her flight and turned off her phone for the eleven hour flight. When she turned it back on there was a message from her friend, "You need to call me right now! You are the number one world wide trending topic on twitter."

Jon Ronson does a fantastic job of telling her story:

 

 

Ronson doesn't finish the story. The story ends where it begun with the Gawker editor who first published Sacco's tweet, Sam Biddle:

Justine Sacco has a PR job she enjoys now, but she deserves the best and biggest PR job, whatever that may be. Give it all to her. Justine Sacco is the most qualified person in her entire field. She has the expertise of ten lifetimes when it comes to dealing with bad press. She survived a genuine personal crisis. She's unkillable, and smart, and she will tell you to shut up, idiot, it can't get any worse.

Learn from Justine. Learn from the experience.

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Trump Win Can’t Be Undone.

Trumps Win Can Not Be Undone, For Me, It’s Become Personal

 

Idiots yell. intellectuals debate opinion. And the wise man is silent. I invite you to comment below. If I say something that resonates with you please let me know. If you disagree, please share. Dialog gives us an opportunity to grow, #WisdomThruRespect . My name is Rho. I am not a speaker. I am a thinker. I do my best thinking in Excel. I’m a data nerd. I am the principal contributor to Assume Wisely, a blog about making decisions.

I believe my experience can be of help as you seek to heal, and heal frayed relationships. In the early hours of election day I seriously considered voting for Trump, I am not politically offended: I understand where republicans are coming from.

It still hurts.

I put his character aside, just as I put hers.

It still hurts.

I was able to excuse a man who is accustomed to having his way with people. Now he has had his way with the american people.

It still hurts. 

Something else is happening. 

I started my morning routine at 4 am on Wednesday like it was any other day. In the wake of Trump’s win the Dow dropped during overnight trading. I was looking for bargains in the market. It is important for me to highlight where my mind was because something had changed and I was not aware.  I had not consumed any media. This wasn’t political upset. This wasn’t the pain of loosing. This wasn’t sadness. This wasn’t mourning.

This was visceral pain. This was fear. It wasn’t until I am getting off the bus that I realize I am feeling uncomfortable. Three things stand out this morning:

  • all the faces on the bus are white.
  • the lavish breakfast spread out for a meeting I was not invited to.
  • the admission of a friend that voted Trump.

Somehow each of these pointed to one singular conclusion. It is important to not let emotions control your decisions, but you should never ignore them. My emotions were hijacked with a sense that . . .

 

. . .  I do not belong.

 

I’ve come to know this feeling well. I feel a sense of accomplishment that I’ve been able to dismiss this feeling. But it still hangs around in the shadows. This week, it stepped out of the shadows. Now I ask, do I belong?

Have I been kidding myself all along?

My friend assures me he isn’t racist. He says, (and I quote)

My heart goes out to those who are in pain or feel our country has turned its back on them. I hope my thoughts may help clear up some of those inaccuracies so heads can be raised, hope rekindled, friends reunited, and we can move forward as one. I hope you can better understand that I (and most of the 60 million of us) didn’t vote for him out of hatred toward you.”

I’ve had several friends justify themselves on Facebook.  They insist they are not racists. In the days leading up to the election I adopted the words of a gay Trump supporter,

Voters do not pull a lever to endorse a candidate’s flaws.

That is still true. But It doesn’t invalidate that I have been wounded. It was not intentional, it was not anticipated. I am equally surprised.  It is nonetheless a wound. I need time to heal. I need to move forward.

 

How Can I Move Forward?

Here in Utah, I am getting involved in politics for the first time. Regardless of who you support, I invite you to walk with me. Subscribe below and we can walk together. The path forward is not clear. But there are some first steps we can take:

  • Get clear on your values.
  • Attend and participate in community meetings.
  • Volunteer with your party.
  • Work on a campaign.
  • Wear a safety pin.

There’s a growing effort in the United States for people to start wearing a safety pin in the face of attacks and harassment. It is literally a safety pin.  One small way to signal that you’re an ally (regardless of who you voted for) to anyone who feels so out of place in this volatile time.

The “safety pin” symbol was inspired by the 2014 #illridewithyou movement in Sydney, Australia. People offered to sit next to Muslims who felt threatened on their commutes — at the time, in the aftermath of a terrorist attack, they feared an Islamophobic backlash.

For those that subscribe below I will be creating a community with content, links, and tips for those who are walking this path for the first time. Involvement is more than voting. Involvement is more than knowing about the Utah caucus system. Involvement is a weekly if not monthly engagement. This is a first for me too. If you are interested in walking this path together, i invite you to subscribe below: