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Category Archives for "Excel Shortcuts"

Excel – Insert more than one row at a time.

How to Quickly Insert multiple blank rows or columns in Excel.

To quickly insert multiple rows in Excel it makes more sense to use a mouse shortcut. You can insert multiple blank rows all at once with the following steps:

Step 1: Select the number of rows you want to insert.

Step 2: Right click the selected rows, and choose the Insert item in the context menu, see this video demonstration below:

 

Alternatively, you can insert one row (right click and select ‘insert’) and then press F4 as many times as you need. This works when you are too lazy to count rows.

 

Did you know there are only a handful of tools that differentiate an excel expert from an intermediate user?

Yesterday my good friend said, “Anytime someone says they are an excel expert I know they don’t know anything.” I know where he is coming from. I have the same bias. As I learn a new tool in Excel I realize how much more there is to learn. But you don’t have to know how to use every tool to be an expert. When it comes to Excel, it really is possible to become an expert in a short amount of time because there are only about a half dozen areas where people get stuck, bottlenecks. Manipulating data is one area where cut, copy, and paste is just a portion. If you would like to access my (Rho Lall’s) full mind-map,  Become An Excel Expert, it covers all five areas. Just follow this link to my become an excel expert mind-map.

 



Excel – Clean, Trim, and other useful formulas to Cleaning up text (data).

Clean, Trim, & useful formulas to Clean up text (data).

When working with data it is often necessary to ‘clean’ the data first so that you can work with it.  Often formatting is distracting or inconsistent, there may be extra spaces between words and on occasion there may be special characters that are not visible but, get in the way of working with data. Sometimes data is not in a format that you can use. This data needs to be prepped for use. Sometimes this is called data processing; we refer to it polishing data. Two common formulas for cleaning data include:

=clean()  Removes special characters from your cell values. 

=trim()  Removes extra spaces between words and at the ends of your cell value.

This video goes into how to use these two functions.



Excel – Uppercase, Lowercase, and The Proper Capitalization.

Uppercase, Lowercase, and The Proper Capitalization.

 

=upper() The upper function puts your text in “all caps”. I.E. “THIS IS AN EXAMPLE OF UPPER.”

=lower() The lower function puts your text into all lower case letters. I.E. “this is an example of lower.”

=proper() The proper function capitalizes the first letter of ever word in the cell value. I.E. “This Is An Example Of Proper.”

This video goes into each function.

 

Did you know there are only a handful of tools that differentiate an excel expert from an intermediate user?

Yesterday my good friend said, “Anytime someone says they are an excel expert I know they don’t know anything.” I know where he is coming from. I have the same bias. As I learn a new tool in Excel I realize how much more there is to learn. But you don’t have to know how to use every tool to be an expert. When it comes to Excel, it really is possible to become an expert in a short amount of time because there are only about a half dozen areas where people get stuck, bottlenecks. Manipulating data is one area where cut, copy, and paste is just a portion. If you would like to access my (Rho Lall’s) full mind-map,  Become An Excel Expert, it covers all five areas. Just follow this link to my become an excel expert mind-map.

 

 

Excel – Switch tabs, move between open workbooks, and Jumping to the last row.

Switch tabs, Move Between Open Workbooks, and Jumping to the Last Row.

 

How to switch between workbooks?

[Alt + Tab] This is the same shortcut to tab through all of your open workbooks. Pressing tab once brings up the selection screen. Pressing tab additional times selects the next window.

[Windows + D] Is a handy shortcut as well. ‘D’ stands for desktop. This short cut minimizes all windows. Pressing it again brings them back. To audit my open windows I like to show my desktop (Windows  D) and then bring each window up at a time using (alt + Tab).

 

How to switch tabs?

[ctrl + page up] To move right across the tabs in your workbook to the end of the list.

[ctrl + page down] To move left across the tabs in your workbook towards the beginning of the list.

 

 

How to jump to the last row of data,  across, and back?

[ ctrl + arrow keys ]You can use the arrow keys, while holding ‘ctrl’ to navigate across your table in all different directions.

 

Did you know there are only a handful of tools that differentiate an excel expert from an intermediate user?

Yesterday my good friend said, “Anytime someone says they are an excel expert I know they don’t know anything.” I know where he is coming from. I have the same bias. As I learn a new tool in Excel I realize how much more there is to learn. But you don’t have to know how to use every tool to be an expert. When it comes to Excel, it really is possible to become an expert in a short amount of time because there are only about a half dozen areas where people get stuck, bottlenecks. Manipulating data is one area where cut, copy, and paste is just a portion. If you would like to access my (Rho Lall’s) full mind-map,  Become An Excel Expert, it covers all five areas. Just follow this link to my become an excel expert mind-map.

 

Excel Shortcuts to Cut, Copy, Paste, & Paste Values.

 

Did you know what three Excel shortcuts save the most time?

A: Cut, copy, paste. 

In this video selection Danny Rocks covers scenarios that show the different applications of the shortcuts:

[copy (ctrl + c)]          [cut (ctrl + x)]          [paste (ctrl + v)] 

 

 

Lynda offers some insightful alternatives to using copy, cut, & paste to move data around.

If you are looking to move data around Lynda offers uncommon wisdom in this video selection. Basically, you can drag selected data by grabbing the boarder while holding down the shift key or selecting using the right mouse button.

And the video goes on to elaborate the application for cells containing formulas.

 

I still prefer the excel shortcuts (cut, copy, paste) to dragging the data with a mouse.

At the end of the day, shortcuts are faster. I prefer to keep my hands on my keyboard. Especially when I am not at my desk and a mouse isn’t handy because track-pads are even slower. Also, the shortcut to paste values is pretty impressive for anyone that might be looking over your shoulder: [Alt, H, V, V].

 

Did you know there are only a handful of tools that differentiate an excel expert from an intermediate user?

Yesterday my good friend said, “Anytime someone says they are an excel expert I know they don’t know anything.” I know where he is coming from. I have the same bias. As I learn a new tool in Excel I realize how much more there is to learn. But you don’t have to know how to use every tool to be an expert. When it comes to Excel, it really is possible to become an expert in a short amount of time because there are only about a half dozen areas where people get stuck, bottlenecks. Manipulating data is one area where cut, copy, and paste is just a portion. If you would like to access my (Rho Lall’s) full mind-map,  Become An Excel Expert, it covers all five areas. Just follow this link to my become an excel expert mind-map.